Tweet Tweet!

HOME 
REVIEWS
albums
singles/downloads
gigs
demos
NEWS
INTERVIEWS
FREE MP3s
STREAMED MUSIC
MUSIC VIDEOS
FORUM
LINKS
ABOUT US
CONTACT US
SEARCH
Follow SXP on Twitter
- RSS Feed
 
SoundsXP Presents
Next show:

BAD FRIDAY!
Peluché,
Dead Coast,
Les Sueques,
Calva Louise,
Flights of Helios,
Videocean,
Dirty Blondes
+ SoundsXP DJs

The Windmill, Brixton
Good Friday, 14th April 2017
3pm till late

Buy tickets here


On Our iPod

Latest Forum Posts
Album Review

Pavement
Quarantine the Past Domino

Article written by Matt H - Mar 6, 2010

quarantine.jpg
Pavement - Sidewalking
The touring return of Pavement has occasioned a “Best of” and an excuse to do a bit of historical research into why the were a band I never really clicked with back when they were all over the music press in the early 90s. On a couple of listens to the meaty 23 tracks selected here it’s not especially a surprise. Not because they’re no good - on the contrary. But the influences echo loudly. At the time, if you’d already heard Dinosaur Jr, the Breeders, the Fall you’d have needed another reason to fall for them. Pavement’s take was, either consciously or dope-cloudedly, California-hip which for many (especially the deeply unhip with a big wodge of heavy metal records) was bound to be a bit alienating.

Look back with a couple of decades’ distance though and you can see what Pavement did for a generation of indie bands. They took what was being done by those mentioned above, plus the likes of (importantly) Calvin Johnson and Sonic Youth, bundled it up into a more consistent, attractive set of songs - great to draw in any spotty youth looking for something to belong to but mark them as gently different at the same time. (If Pavement’s loose-limbed charm sometimes drifts into utter aimlessness, that’s as nothing next to toe-curling patchiness of things like early Sebadoh.) So in the same way that you can hear influences in their songs, you can hear what Pavement did to others’ ideas coming through in the bands of the last decade - from the anti-folkers to the likes of Conor Oberst to your better local bands (Smokers Die Younger round these parts). Their faults too - there’s a fair amount of the sort of navel-gazing music scene in-jokery which tediously reoccurs in a lot indie music now.

Nevertheless, as history lessons go, Quarantine the Past is enjoyable and laced with its fair share of charming and engaging tunes. I’m not especially regretting neglecting them, but I’m glad to have found what I have, and for what they’ve since helped to create.

Links:
http://www.matadorrecords.com/pavement/
http://www.dominorecordco.com
http://www.myspace.com/pavement

LATEST FEATURES
Remembering the Radio Trent Rock Show
LATEST NEWS
Wedding Present headline Refugee Rock benefit
Blitzen Trappen visualise sound of new album
Extended Katsenjamming
Yuck Spit Out New Album Update, Share First Track
Need Replacements For Your Old Vinyl? Alt-Rock Pioneers' Reissues Coming Soon
Music & Booze At Old Spitafields Independent Music Market This Saturday
Micachu and The Shapes New Album Could Be Good... Or Bad
Public Image Ltd.'s New Album Can Only Mean Trouble (And Rants About Plumbers...)
Alive & On Fire: The Dead Weather Announce First Album In Five Years
A Spectre From The Past With Veruca Salt's New LP? Listen In Full!
LATEST FREE MP3s
Foxtails Brigade "Far Away and Long Ago"
North By North "Pistoletta"
Die Liga der gewöhnlichen Gentlemen "Nach dem Spiel"
Theatre Royal "The Days Grow Hotter"
Oliver Gottwald "Freunde fürs Leben"
Heart/Dancer "Outro"
Clowwns "Idiot Bouncing"
Double Denim "Wide Open"
Flout "Rainchecks"
The Scenes "City Of White Blankets"

 

© Sounds XP Design by Darren O'Connor and Adam Walker